John Fitzgerald Kennedy said "We choose to go.because. "We choose to go to the Moon", officially titled as the Address at Rice University on the Nation's Space Effort, is a speech delivered by United States President John F. We choose to go.because it is easy, but because it is hard, because that goal will serve to measure and organize the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win.”.

We Choose the Moon - YouTube Kennedy about the effort to reach the Moon to a large crowd gathered at Rice Stadium in Houston, Texas, on September 12, 1962. We choose to go to the moon, not because they are easy but because they are hard ! What you've learned about it ? Video belongs to NASA. We choose to go to the moon, not because they are easy but.

We choose to do this not because it's easy, but because it's hard. The speech was intended to persuade the American people to support the Apollo program, the national effort to land a man on the Moon. We choose to go to the moon not because it's easy, but because it's hard; because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our.

JFK's 'Moon Speech' Still Resonates, 50 Years Later Space In his speech, Kennedy characterized space as a new frontier, invoking the pioneer spirit that dominated American folklore. Clearly, it's important, because you've got a president who steps up and. not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that.

Jens Lekman – Not Because It's Easy, But Because It's Hard. He infused the speech with a sense of urgency and destiny, and emphasized the freedom enjoyed by Americans to choose their destiny rather than have it chosen for them. Not Because It's Easy, But Because It's Hard Lyrics Knock knock, are you there? / Sorry to wake you, my fellow bear / I'll slip this song under a rock somewhere / So you can hear it when it's.

We choose to go to the moon - Wikisource, the free online library Although he called for competition with the Soviet Union, Kennedy also proposed making the Moon landing a joint project. Interrupted by applause we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.